Spring Chaos

Phew! It's been a minute since I've written, huh? Spring is in full swing, and I'm in peak chaos! I thought I'd take a minute today to share some of the cool things going on in the garden. 

French breakfast radish

French breakfast radish

The girls in pre-K became intrigued by root vegetables recently. They just love it that some veggies grow underground. (I love how wondrous the world is through a child's eyes!) They decided to plant one of the raised beds on the farm with three different kinds of root vegetables to observe how they grew. The girls planted French breakfast radishes, Easter egg radishes, and Chioggia beets. They came out to the farm almost every day to observe, take pictures, and measure the plants' growth. Well, last week the radishes were ready, and they got to pull them up! They loved making predictions about what the radishes would look like before they pulled them out of the ground. That was especially fun to do with the Easter egg radishes, because they were all different colors! The Chioggia beets are still in the ground and will be ready in a few weeks.

Blue bonnet rice

Blue bonnet rice

I've also been working on a cool project with upper school girls. Our sophomore English class read The Things They Carried, which is a novel about the Vietnam War. Many of the scenes take place in rice paddies in Vietnam. To help the girls better understand the setting, we learned about traditional methods of growing rice. We watched videos of rice production, looked at pictures, and then got to start our own rice from seed. The plants are shooting up in our grow light station, and we'll plant them outside next week. This rice is a highland variety, which takes less water to grow than lowland varieties. I've never grown rice before, so I'm looking forward to learning about it more. I'll keep y'all posted!

The production and planting schedule is just going gangbusters over here. In the last week, we've harvested hundreds of pounds of leeks, bok choy, radishes, sorrel, arugula, green garlic, herbs. We've planted okra, basil, cantaloupe, cotton, kohlrabi, cosmos, and tomatoes. And the flowers! The flowers are stunning right now. Snapdragons, anemones, bachelor's buttons, nigella, and larkspur are at their peak. It might be chaotic right now, but I wouldn't trade it for anything. It's good to be a grower in April!

What's going on in your garden this month? Tell me all about it in the comments or on one of my social media pages! 

Happy growing, 

Mary Riddle

My leek-y sink. ;) 

My leek-y sink. ;) 

Girls harvesting baby bok choy

Girls harvesting baby bok choy

Growing with Children

I love teaching. I've taught children, and I've taught adults. Showing people how to grow is my passion. I'm lucky to be teaching horticulture on a school farm at a fantastic girls' school here in Memphis. It is a joy to come to work every day.

I wanted to share a fun project that I'm working on with my pre-K girls. This class of girls worked with me in the beginning of the school year planting carrots. We grew two beds of carrots, one purple and one orange. They got to plant, harvest, and cook with the carrots. They counted how many they picked and performed a taste test to see if they could taste the difference between purple and orange carrots. They also made carrot cake.

The carrot project got them interested in other root vegetables. The school where I work uses the Reggio approach, meaning that the girls get to guide much of their own learning. This particular Pre-K class decided they wanted to learn about other kinds of vegetables that grow under the soil, so I visited their classroom and showed them photos of lots of different root crops: different colors of beets, radishes, leeks, and turnips. They decided they wanted to grow D'Avignon radishes, Easter Egg radishes, and Chioggia beets.

We divided this bed into three equal sections. I planted most of the rows before the class came out to the farm to ensure production quantity, but let the girls help me plant the last row of each section. I showed them pictures of their chosen vegetables to refresh their memories, and they made predictions about what the seeds would look like. They poked a hole in the soil with their finger, placed their seed in the hole, and lightly covered it with soil. 

I used the low tunnel hoops and some mason twine to partition the bed into three sections.

I used the low tunnel hoops and some mason twine to partition the bed into three sections.

Easter Egg radish seeds

Easter Egg radish seeds

The D'Avignon radishes take about 3 weeks to mature, the Easter Egg radishes take about 30 days, and the Chioggia beets take around 55 days to mature. The girls come out to the farm every few days to look for changes to the bed that they planted. They're going to observe and discover which of the root crops take the longest to grow, and they'll get to taste new vegetables in the process. 

We also got to smell the cilantro emerging from its winter hibernation, taste the lemony sorrel, and smell the apple blossoms. It wasn't a bad way to spend a sunny, 75 degree February day!

Happy growing!

Mary Riddle

The girls loved comparing how dirty their hands got while planting. 

The girls loved comparing how dirty their hands got while planting.