Hello again!

Hey friends!

I’m embarrassed to say that it’s been over a year since I’ve posted anything. I’ve been busy doing things like having a baby and trying to catch up on some sweet, precious, elusive sleep. However, I’ve got a calendar of posts coming your way soon. Until then, check out this video of yours truly showing off our wonderful school garden at Hutchison School.

Happy growing,

Mary Riddle

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Farm to Blanket

Every spring, the second graders at my school work on a quilting project with their mothers. It's a part of their unit in which they study Faith Ringgold, an African American artist well known for her narrative quilts. They study chemical reactions in science at the same time, so to tie it all together, the girls make natural dyes using vegetables from our farm and dye fabric squares to create their own narrative quilts. Cross-curricular learning is so cool, isn't it?

First, I bought a couple of yards of muslin and cut it into individual squares. I boiled the squares in salt water for an hour in order to make it more receptive to the dye.

While the squares were boiling, I chopped up the vegetables and put them in individual pots. I had one pot of red cabbage, one of spinach, and one of beets. I added about twice as much water as vegetable matter to each pot, then turned the heat up to medium high. I let the vegetables simmer for about an hour. I watched the color slowly leech from the vegetables and into the water.

As an aside, the red cabbage dye was fun, because it reacts to a change in its pH. I added just a little bit of lemon juice and the purple water turned to a bright magenta.  

I took the muslin squares out of the boiling water and let them cool. Each second grade girl got to help ring out their fabric squares. Then, they dropped their squares into whichever pot of dye they liked. I didn't remove the veggies before adding the muslin.

I let the muslin and veggies simmer for several more hours, then drained the pots and rinsed the fabric squares. It was a little tedious washing veggie specks off of the fabric, but I liked the visual effect of letting my students see that the vegetables were causing the colors to change.

The spinach dye didn't do much for me. The squares are just marginally darker than the original shade of the muslin. The beets turned the muslin a pretty light rose color, and the lemon juice-cabbage concoction turned the fabric a kind of muted fuschia. 

If you have any leftover garden scraps and a plain shirt or tablecloth to dye, I highly recommend this process! It was fun, educational, and let us use some of the plants that we might normally compost. 

Happy growing, 

Mary Riddle

spinach, beet, and red cabbage dyed muslin

spinach, beet, and red cabbage dyed muslin

The Girl-Powered, Math-Powered, Poetry-Powered, Chinese Vegetable School Farm Project

It was sixth grade when I first learned that I was bad at math. It was our pre-algebra unit, and it was the first time I'd ever felt challenged by a math problem. I was trying to quickly wipe away my frustrated tears when I was told, "That's okay. You're more of a reader than a mathematician."

I did as little math as I could get away with in high school and college. I remember feeling confused: I noticed that I could add and multiply sums more quickly than many of my peers. I even tested into one of the more advanced math classes at my school, but I thought it was all a fluke. "I'm a reader, not a mathematician," I thought. 

I became interested in agriculture, because I was interested in the spiritual, poetic, Wendell Berry aspect of farming. Little did I know at the time that my chosen career path was inherently mathematical. My job a a horticulturist is just a series of mathematical word problems, all day long: fertilizer ratios, days to plant maturity, row spacing, building with the Pythagorean theorem, estimating yields. 

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At the girls' school where I work, I collaborated with the fifth grade math, English, and Chinese teachers to create a cross-curricular project that shows the girls that math, poetry, world languages, and farming are all complementary, and they can be good at all of it. 

The girls were in the midst of their poetry unit called "Bloom Where You're Planted" in their English class. They read Maya Angelou's "Still I Rise," then came to my farm lab to learn how to plant. 

We divided the girls up into three small groups and had them create mathematical arrays out of these Jiffy peat pellets. (As an aside, I prefer to plant in these peat pellets for school projects, because they're much easier for young ones to handle while planting.) The pellets come dried and compacted, and they need to soak in water to expand into plantable little nuggets.

Once they created an array, they filled their trays with water. While we waited for the pellets to puff up, the girls were given an assignment to start writing a poem, using some of the themes and imagery of planting, growing, and blooming, as well as some of the poetic structures they learned about in a previous English class.

Once the pellets were ready, pencils were put away and the girls were given their Chinese vegetable seeds to plant. They had to work with one another to ensure that each peat pellet got only one seed. The trays of veggies went into my grow light station. 

A few days later, the same group of girls came out to the farm with their math class. They were given measuring tools and a bundle of little flags. They had to figure out the dimensions of the bed. Then, I told them that each plant needed to be at least 8 inches apart from one another in rows that were at least 12 inches apart, and the plants couldn't be closer than four inches from the edge of the bed. Using those parameters, they had to figure out the maximum number of plants we could plant in each bed. They flagged out where each plant should go. They also figured out the volume of empty space in the raised bed and calculated how much compost I should add to the raised bed to reach the very top. 

The weather turned cold, so I transplanted their Chinese vegetables on the farm for them. Now, I'm collaborating with their Chinese teacher to plan the next aspect of the lesson. We'll harvest the bok choy and green garlic from the farm in a couple of weeks. The girls will learn how to cook and eat bok choy, while simultaneously learning Chinese culinary vocabulary words. 

One of my favorite tools for transplanting vegetables with kids: the dibbler.

One of my favorite tools for transplanting vegetables with kids: the dibbler.

The girls are learning that nothing is in a silo. What they learn in one class connects to their other studies and connects to the outside world. They're learning that math shows up in places that they may not expect. Their mathematical computations helped me solve a real-life problem, and they'll soon be able to harvest and taste the fruits of their labor. I hope they're learning that they can become poets, mathematicians, linguists, farmers... or even all of those things at once.

Happy growing, 

Mary

Growing with Children

I love teaching. I've taught children, and I've taught adults. Showing people how to grow is my passion. I'm lucky to be teaching horticulture on a school farm at a fantastic girls' school here in Memphis. It is a joy to come to work every day.

I wanted to share a fun project that I'm working on with my pre-K girls. This class of girls worked with me in the beginning of the school year planting carrots. We grew two beds of carrots, one purple and one orange. They got to plant, harvest, and cook with the carrots. They counted how many they picked and performed a taste test to see if they could taste the difference between purple and orange carrots. They also made carrot cake.

The carrot project got them interested in other root vegetables. The school where I work uses the Reggio approach, meaning that the girls get to guide much of their own learning. This particular Pre-K class decided they wanted to learn about other kinds of vegetables that grow under the soil, so I visited their classroom and showed them photos of lots of different root crops: different colors of beets, radishes, leeks, and turnips. They decided they wanted to grow D'Avignon radishes, Easter Egg radishes, and Chioggia beets.

We divided this bed into three equal sections. I planted most of the rows before the class came out to the farm to ensure production quantity, but let the girls help me plant the last row of each section. I showed them pictures of their chosen vegetables to refresh their memories, and they made predictions about what the seeds would look like. They poked a hole in the soil with their finger, placed their seed in the hole, and lightly covered it with soil. 

I used the low tunnel hoops and some mason twine to partition the bed into three sections.

I used the low tunnel hoops and some mason twine to partition the bed into three sections.

Easter Egg radish seeds

Easter Egg radish seeds

The D'Avignon radishes take about 3 weeks to mature, the Easter Egg radishes take about 30 days, and the Chioggia beets take around 55 days to mature. The girls come out to the farm every few days to look for changes to the bed that they planted. They're going to observe and discover which of the root crops take the longest to grow, and they'll get to taste new vegetables in the process. 

We also got to smell the cilantro emerging from its winter hibernation, taste the lemony sorrel, and smell the apple blossoms. It wasn't a bad way to spend a sunny, 75 degree February day!

Happy growing!

Mary Riddle

The girls loved comparing how dirty their hands got while planting. 

The girls loved comparing how dirty their hands got while planting.