When Should I Harvest Garlic?

Back in February, I told y'all all about how I fertilize, weed, and mulch to prepare for an awesome garlic harvest. Well, that magical season is upon us, so now I'm here to show you how to know when it's the right time to dig up your precious garlicky treasures. 

I grow two different kinds of garlic, hard neck and soft neck. I like to grow soft neck varieties, because you can make garlic braids from them. I like hard neck varieties, because the cloves are usually a bit bigger, and they also send up garlic scapes. 

There! That's a garlic scape.

There! That's a garlic scape.

Scapes are the blossom that the hard neck garlic plants send up just a few weeks before it's time to harvest. They are DELICIOUS. If you grow hard neck garlic, you should definitely pinch off the scapes and cook with them. They're divine. 

Usually, 2-4 weeks after you've harvested your scapes, the bottom leaves of your garlic plant start turning yellow and withering. With soft neck varieties, you'll see this yellowing without having the scapes tip you off first. When about one third of the leaves turn yellow, I know it's time to dig up the garlic. 

So here's how I do it. First, I always pull one or two bulbs up and cut them open, just to make sure I can see the cloves and everything looks like it's ready to go. If it looks like the cloves are fully formed, I go through my raised bed with a potato fork and loosen up the soil really well. Then, it's time to pull. Pull from the base to make sure you don't break off the stems. 

I move my garlic to the shade immediately and begin spacing them out on tables or hanging them up in my shed. Do not wash or trim them first! I gently tap the dirt off and hang them up just as they are. Your garlic needs 2-3 weeks in a cool, shady, well-ventilated room in order to cure. When garlic cures, the outside dries up, while the inside cloves are still moist and flavorful. After it's finished curing, you can wipe off the remaining dirt and trim the leaves and roots off.

After my soft neck garlic cures, I'll walk you through the process of making garlic braids. Stay tuned! 

Happy growing, 

Mary Riddle

Hanging up garlic to cure

Hanging up garlic to cure

Getting Ready for Garlic

Garlic is one of my favorite crops to grow. It's a crop that doesn't take a lot of time or maintenance, but the payoff is huge. Who doesn't love fresh garlic? No one. I wouldn't trust someone who doesn't love garlic.

Two fertilizers and the view from my kitchen window.

Two fertilizers and the view from my kitchen window.

I order my garlic every year from Peaceful Valley. I typically grow both hardneck and softneck garlic. I like the scapes that the hardneck garlic provides, but I like to be able to braid my garlic for storage, like you do with softneck. Back in early October, I planted two beds of Music, a hardneck variety, and three beds of California Early White, a softneck variety. I planted an extra bed of California Early White, because I plan on harvesting one of the beds early before its bulb fills out to use as "green garlic." (I'm serious about my garlic, okay?)

Like I said, garlic doesn't require a lot of maintenance. I weed the beds fairly regularly. It likes to be mulched over the winter. It does require a little bit of fertilization, though, and that's what I spent this balmy, 78 degree President's Day doing. 

My rule of thumb is to fertilize garlic three times: once in planting, once on Valentine's Day, and once on St. Patrick's Day. (I'm a little bit late this year, but that's alright.) Garlic likes a lot of nitrogen when it's still in its leafing stage, before it starts growing its bulb, so I use a 50-50 blend of worm castings and blood meal. Once I combine my fertilizers, I side dress each garlic plant with a small scoop of the mix and try to work it down into the soil an inch or two. I'll do this exact same thing again in a month, but then after that, I stop fertilizing and let nature do its thing. If you fertilize too late, it would encourage the plant to continue a vigorous leaf growth when you want it working on growing a bigger bulb. 

As I keep saying, it's been a bizarrely warm winter, so I'm guessing that my garlic is going to be ready earlier than usual this year. I can typically harvest green garlic in April, scapes in May, and bulbs in June. If the weather keeps this current pattern going, I'll be about a month ahead of that schedule. If the bulbs start filling out early, I'll adjust my fertilization schedule. Good growing is all about watching what nature brings you and adapting.

 

Short sleeves and short dresses in February. 

Short sleeves and short dresses in February.