Snapdragons are a Snap

Armloads of snaps!

Armloads of snaps!

I'm in the midst of the most prolific harvest of snapdragons you've ever seen. Not only are they fragrant, but their beauty is the kind that almost hurts your heart. With a little bit of planning, they're pretty easy to grow! I'm here to tell you how. 

Plan now for fall planting. I usually recommend placing orders for your desired flower seed as that particular flower's season comes to a close. I'll have these snaps for a few more weeks, then I'll go over my harvest records, decide which snaps I like the best (or if there was one I wouldn't order again) then place my seed order. Once the seeds arrive, I keep them stored in a cool, dark, dry place until I need them in the fall. I always like to order early so that I don't get caught in a pinch if the varieties I want are back-ordered. 

I planted these snapdragons with my students back in October. They are a little finicky. (The snapdragons, not the students!) The seeds are TINY and must be kept on top of the soil, because they need light to germinate. I germinated them indoors, then planted them outside after they had several sets of true leaves.This took about six weeks. While I was waiting for them to grow, I made sure my beds were free of debris, and I applied Mighty Grow fertilizer. Once ready, I planted my snapdragons about a foot apart. I planted them this far apart, because I wanted lots of side branches on mine. If you want longer, stronger stems, you can plant them four inches apart. If you do it this way, you'll only get one cut from each plant.

Potomac, Rocket, and Madame Butterfly snapdragons

Potomac, Rocket, and Madame Butterfly snapdragons

If you want perfectly straight snapdragons that never tilt over, you'll want to add an extra step before you plant: installing Hortonova. I recommend pounding rebar into the corners of your beds and about every four to six feet along the length of your beds. Stretch your Hortonova tight over the top of the bed so that it is completely parallel to you soil below, about a foot above the ground. You can even use taller rebar and add a second layer of Hortonova another 8-12" above your first layer for extra support. I like to make sure the netting is extra secure by using small zip ties to attach it to the rebar. The Hortonova makes it a lot easier to perfectly space your plants, because it basically lays out a perfect grid on top of your soil. It's also great for all you perfectionists out there: I've gotten a few funky shaped snapdragons, because snaps are geotropic. That means that if the stems have fallen over and are at an angle to the ground, the blooms will bend themselves back up to try and grow straight up to the sky. 

Snapdragons with row covers, March 2017

Snapdragons with row covers, March 2017

I pinched my seedlings back to about half their height when I transplanted them in early November. I made sure to keep them covered with frost cloth during times when the temperatures were dropping well below freezing. I pinched them a few times throughout the winter.

I planted three different kinds of snapdragons to try and extend my snapdragon season. My Rocket snapdragons bloomed first, followed by Potomacs, and then Madame Butterfly. Madame Butterfly snaps are frillier open-faced blooms that don't have the traditional snapdragon look. But I think they're stunning, so I grow them, too. 

Stunning Madame Butterfly snapdragon

Stunning Madame Butterfly snapdragon

These flowers have just shattered my heart with their beauty and fragrance. I've gotten hundreds of stems over three feet tall, and lots of beautiful side stems that are a little smaller that have been wonderful for smaller arrangements. I harvest them when the the flower spikes are about 1/3 open. I strip all the leaves off before putting them in my harvest bucket. I've been posting pictures of the snapdragons' progress over on my social media accounts, so check them out. 

If you like what you see, I highly recommend planning now to plant them this fall. You won't be disappointed!

Happy growing,

Mary Riddle

 

First snapdragon harvest of the year on April 9, even after several pinchings! These are Rocket snapdragons.

First snapdragon harvest of the year on April 9, even after several pinchings! These are Rocket snapdragons.

Agrostemma Githago... say what?

I first saw agrostemma at the Memphis Farmers Market about eight or nine years ago. I was a recent college graduate, and the full weight of my student loans had just come crashing down on my head. I definitely didn't have a lot of discretionary income. Budgetary concerns no longer mattered once I saw those agrostemmas. It was love at first sight. I bought the biggest bunch of those delicate, wispy stems as I could carry and made my way home with them, good intentions for vegetables be damned. I proudly displayed them on my kitchen table, and to my surprise and delight, those gorgeous blooms lasted for close to two weeks. I was hooked. 

I tried a couple of different times to grow agrostemma over the years, but it never went well for me. I started my seeds in late winter or early spring, but both times it got too hot for the plant before I ever saw a blossom. Last year, I read Lisa Mason Zeigler's book Cool Flowers, and I started wondering if I could apply those same principles to my elusive agrostemma dreams. 

This photo was taken about a month ago. Pretty good for January!

This photo was taken about a month ago. Pretty good for January!

I ordered both the Ocean Pearls and Purple Queen varieties from Johnny's back in the fall and started the seeds indoors under grow lights in October. We had a warm fall here in Memphis, so I planted them outdoors about six weeks later. 

This bed of agrostemma has grown all winter long under row covers. The darker days and cool weather helps to elongate the stems. I've had to pull a couple of the plants due to stem rot, but once I took the row covers off and allowed for more airflow, the problem cleared up. 

These stems are over two feet tall now, and they've even started to send up little buds. In FEBRUARY. Have I mentioned that it's been ridiculously mild? I'm keeping my fingers crossed that we don't get another killing freeze before I get to enjoy these blossoms. I've waited a long time to have these grace my kitchen table again.